Garry Cooper-Stanton

Doctoral Researcher, MSc, BSc, Clinical Nurse Specialist (lymphoedema) and Queens Nurse

Clinical Interests:

Lymphoedema – Primary and secondary related to cause and management.
Chronic Oedema – across all causes and its management.
Lipoedema – causes and management

Professional Profile:

Garry is currently a doctoral researcher undertaking his PhD with a focus upon men diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema. He has presented his initial results from his systematic review at national and international conferences. Alongside Garry’s research he works in both the academic and clinical setting. He is the director of the pre-registration programme within the School of Nursing at the University of Birmingham and continues to work as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Lymphoedema. He has worked across a number of sectors, including, public (NHS), private (business) and charitable sector within primary care (community). In recognition of his commitment and passion to primary care he was awarded the title of Queen’s Nurse from the Queen’s Nurse Institute. Garry has written a number of articles related to his specialist field and completed an MSc in this area. To this end his remains a passionate advocate for lymphology and the using of research to improve patients’ quality of life.

NHS Base:

Walsall Lymphoedema Service, Walsall Palliative Care Centre, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust and School of Nursing, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.

Objectives and Summary of my Research – Men and Lymphoedema:

The aim of the research is to explore the experiences of men diagnosed and living with non-cancer related lymphoedema, which is also known as chronic oedema. This extends to how these experiences affect their ability to partake in the self-management of their long-term condition, and the perception not only of the support they receive, but also of themselves. Lymphoedema causes swelling in any part of the body, due to damage to the lymphatics, such as externally by surgery, or internally by genetics as examples (National Lymphoedema Partnership (NLP), 2015). The condition affects both men and women, which at the present time has no known cure, with limited success with surgical, and/or medication (ILF, 2006; 2015). However, the swelling is only one part of a complex condition that can impact upon a person’s mental health, socially and occupationally, such as depression, recreational activities, and work.

To assist in determining the relevance of the study, a scoping exercise was undertaken, and led to the following summary:

  1. The male voice within the literature is marginalised when compared to the female narrative, due to their limited presence within the focus, but also their inclusion within research (Cosgiff et al, 2010). This marginalisation also extends to the limited application to theory, such as gender theory, but also comparisons to other male focused studies on chronic diseases.
  2. The integration of the male and female voice within single studies does not address the relevance of gender theory and its expression in the form of masculinity (Jeans et al, 2019; Hamilton, 2015; Towers et al, 2008).
  3. The focus upon male cancer related lymphoedema has occurred within several qualitative research studies, but this has not extended to non-cancer related lymphoedema with a clear focus upon men (Tidhar et al, 2018; Williams et al, 2004; Cosgiff et al, 2010).
  4. There have only been three qualitative studies within the UK with none of them focusing solely on the male perspective, and did not consider gender theory, or its expression within their work (Michael et al, 2019: Peter et al, 2015).

Main Research Question: What are the perceptions of men diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema, and the perceived impact of their condition from a biopsychosocial perspective?

To answer the overall arching question the following sub research questions are included:

  1. How do men perceive their diagnosis of non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  2. What is the male perception of self-managing their non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  3. How do men perceive their masculinity when diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  4. How do men perceive support within their diagnosis and management of non-cancer related lymphoedema?

Link to survey – https://forms.office.com/r/AGy0VnxrUh

Garry Cooper-Stanton

Doctoral Researcher, MSc, BSc, Clinical Nurse Specialist (lymphoedema) and Queens Nurse

Clinical Interests:

Lymphoedema – Primary and secondary related to cause and management.
Chronic Oedema – across all causes and its management.
Lipoedema – causes and management

Professional Profile:

Garry is currently a doctoral researcher undertaking his PhD with a focus upon men diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema. He has presented his initial results from his systematic review at national and international conferences. Alongside Garry’s research he is works in both the academic and clinical setting. He is the director of the pre-registration programme within the School of Nursing at the University of Birmingham and continues to work as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Lymphoedema. He has worked across a number of sectors, including, public (NHS), private (business) and charitable sector within primary care (community). In recognition of his commitment and passion to primary care he was awarded the title of Queen’s Nurse from the Queen’s Nurse Institute. Garry has written a number of articles related to his specialist field and completed an MSc in this area. To this end his remains a passionate advocate for lymphology and the using of research to improve patients’ quality of life.

NHS Base:

Walsall Lymphoedema Service, Walsall Palliative Care Centre, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust and School of Nursing, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.

Objectives and Summary of my Research – Men and Lymphoedema:

The aim of the research is to explore the experiences of men diagnosed and living with non-cancer related lymphoedema, which is also known as chronic oedema. This extends to how these experiences affect their ability to partake in the self-management of their long-term condition, and the perception not only of the support they receive, but also of themselves. Lymphoedema causes swelling in any part of the body, due to damage to the lymphatics, such as externally by surgery, or internally by genetics as examples (National Lymphoedema Partnership (NLP), 2015). The condition affects both men and women, which at the present time has no known cure, with limited success with surgical, and/or medication (ILF, 2006; 2015). However, the swelling is only one part of a complex condition that can impact upon a person’s mental health, socially and occupationally, such as depression, recreational activities, and work.

To assist in determining the relevance of the study, a scoping exercise was undertaken, and led to the following summary:

  1. The male voice within the literature is marginalised when compared to the female narrative, due to their limited presence within the focus, but also their inclusion within research (Cosgiff et al, 2010). This marginalisation also extends to the limited application to theory, such as gender theory, but also comparisons to other male focused studies on chronic diseases.
  2. The integration of the male and female voice within single studies does not address the relevance of gender theory and its expression in the form of masculinity (Jeans et al, 2019; Hamilton, 2015; Towers et al, 2008).
  3. The focus upon male cancer related lymphoedema has occurred within several qualitative research studies, but this has not extended to non-cancer related lymphoedema with a clear focus upon men (Tidhar et al, 2018; Williams et al, 2004; Cosgiff et al, 2010).
  4. There have only been three qualitative studies within the UK with none of them focusing solely on the male perspective, and did not consider gender theory, or its expression within their work (Michael et al, 2019: Peter et al, 2015).

Main Research Question: What are the perceptions of men diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema, and the perceived impact of their condition from a biopsychosocial perspective?

To answer the overall arching question the following sub research questions are included:

  1. How do men perceive their diagnosis of non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  2. What is the male perception of self-managing their non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  3. How do men perceive their masculinity when diagnosed with non-cancer related lymphoedema?
  4. How do men perceive support within their diagnosis and management of non-cancer related lymphoedema?

Link to survey – https://forms.office.com/r/AGy0VnxrUh

Contact Details

How to LIVE BETTER with LYMPHOEDEMA

The new book by Matt Hazledine is available to buy NOW!

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How to LIVE BETTER with LYMPHOEDEMA

The new book by Matt Hazledine is available to buy NOW!

25% of pre-tax profits from book sales will be donated to the lymphoedema Research Fund.

Become a member

Sign up as a Free Member to receive Exclusive Benefits, including access to Articles and Videos from the Experts, a Unique Discount Code from the Suppliers, Members’ Offers and a Quarterly eNewsletter with the latest news from the lymphoedema community.

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